Wednesday Weekly Wisdom #6: Classroom Co-teachers

Welcome to Wednesday Weekly Wisdom. Click here for background on what I mean, or read last week’s post here

I’m going to keep going on last week’s theme of feeling a little clueless and make this week: “what’s my job again 2: classroom teacher edition.” Specifically, I’m gearing this towards classroom teachers in the co-teach model, though, many of the same tips apply to TA-support.

As the classroom teacher for a remote class, you are the single most important person in the success of your classroom. The content that the remote volunteers are delivering could be the best in the world, but without your support, those lessons will fall flat.

What does that support look like? Parts of running “remote classrooms” are things you’ll be very familiar with from running any other classroom. Getting to know your students, encouraging questions, keeping focus, handling behavior, and managing IEPs are all things you’ll do in this class just like any other.

So, let’s focus on some of the differences. The biggest one is a step that can be kind of daunting – not only inviting other instructors into your classroom, but also handing off primary content delivery to them. This may make you feeling a bit secondary – you’re not! Resist this feeling! Remember that you have the greatest ability to welcome the remote volunteers into your classroom, and to make interacting with the feel normal. Students will follow your lead.

Some practical tips to consider:

  • Talk to the remote volunteers in front of the class
    • Say good morning all together
    • Help repeat the instructions
    • When the volunteers indicate, re-prompt the class for questions or to raise hands
    • Let the volunteers know how the class is doing – you have the best view of facial expressions and body language, and are the only person who can feel when the room is full on confusion
  • Remind students to ask the volunteers questions
    • You should handle as much as you can, but you’ll probably get overwhelmed
    • Encourage students to ask their questions, even non-curriculum related ones, to the volunteers
    • Ask your own questions, even in front of class. You’re a student too, and it sets a great example for them to “do as I do, not just as I say”
  • Keep students engaged
    • Walk around the classroom – distracted students stay more on task when someone is over their shoulder
    • Take note of which students engage with the remote volunteers, and which shy away. The shy ones in particular will needs extra encouragement to connect, and some more in person help from you

I want to close this post out by inviting the classroom teachers we have here on the forums to chime in. What were some of your challenges in your first year as a TEALS co-teacher? What were successful and less-than-successful strategies for running your remote classrooms? What’s something I should absolutely steal and take back to mine?

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