Wednesday Weekly Wisdom #3: Visit Early, Visit Often

Welcome to Weekly Wisdom Wednesday. Click here for background on what I mean, or read last week’s post here. This week’s post is a little more focused on a TEALS mechanic of remote volunteers visiting their partner schools, but contains important ideas for all remote educators

 

While many Weekly Wisdoms will focus on ideas, not classroom mechanics, I’m dedicating this entire post to one mechanic.

Visit your classrooms. Visit as early as you can, and visit as often as you can.

TEALS provides recommendations and guidelines for trips, as well as money to reimburse expenses. Keep that link handy. And, take note of where it states you have up to $1000 per remote volunteer for travel expenses. For those of you who have to take a flight to visit your schools, this will indeed only cover a couple of trips, so you’ll want to plan them particularly well. But for those of you within a few hours drive of your schools, even with costs for gas, rental cars, and/or hotels, your limiting factor on visits is mostly likely to be the time you have available, not the cost.

Spend as much time as your calendar and TEALS budget allow. It’s the single biggest classroom-improving action within your control. No other single class can have as much impact, inject as much energy, or build as many bonds as your physical presence in your school.

First as foremost, classroom visits are the best way for students to get to know you, and you to get to know your students. This is biggest aspect of the “visit early” recommendation. For all of the strategies available to minimize the effects of distance and online separation, it still involves being separate. You’re a person that exists, sure, but you exist largely in your student’s minds – more like an interactive character in a video game rather than a real person.

But when you step into the classroom for the first time, you immediately and irreversibly become a real person. You have a three dimensional form, they can see all of your hand gestures when you talk, and there’s no lag between when they ask a question and when you answer. And even when you’re no longer there, they can remember the you that exists in real life, not just how they imagine you. There’s a powerful difference between your students knowing you and meeting you.

Visiting often will help build your relationship with your students more quickly, so the more often you can spare, the better. This is especially important for students who are struggling. Online, it’s easy for your students to say things are going well or keep responses basic. But when you’re with them in person, with your human appearance and friendly face, you are far more likely to get a truthful answer from a student who wants to say, “I’m don’t think I’m doing well in this class.”

So, what should you do with all the visits you’re going to go on? I mentioned some ideas when I talked about how you’re cooler than you think, and I recommend all of them from personal experience. The general idea is to do whatever give you the most interaction with your students. Often, this means a culture day – it’s a good use of time! Summer Training #2 in Redmond provided some handouts about good ways to get to know your students and school, so review those when they hit Canvas (I would have unbelievable amounts of fun working out a scavenger hunt my students made for me).

There’s about a month until school starts. Have you planned your first visit yet?

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